The Mousetrap at St. Martin’s Theatre: Review

The Mousetrap opened in 1952 at the Ambassadors before finding its home at St. Martin’s Theatre for the past forty years, making it the longest running West End show and boasting among its past cast members the likes of Richard Attenborough.  I was first introduced to Agatha Christie’s The Mousetrap years ago, in a newspaper…

Review: The Story of a New Name by Elena Ferrante

The Neapolitan Novels – Book #2 My first thoughts after finishing this were:  I need to get hold of the next book ASAP. I need to read about more incredible women. Real women. Fleshed out. Loving, hateful, selfish, ambitious, strong, weak, insecure. Real. Just like Elena Ferrante’s women. Reading this novel, I felt a flurry…

Best things I watched in 2016

Just like it was a slow year for me in terms of books read, the same went for the things that I watched. Nevertheless, what I did end up watching ranged between good to excellent. Here are my top 6 (I cheated and added 1) movies/TV Shows/plays I watched in 2016: BBC’s War & Peace…

Best Books of 2016

It’s that time of the year – the time of the year-end lists. I was almost hesitant to write this ‘Best books of 2016’ post because 2016, all in all, has been bad for me reading wise. I read far fewer books than I usually do and in the beginning of the year, I went…

Book Review: A Summer of Drowning by John Burnside

A Summer of Drowning is one of those books with no real plots, but then it doesn’t really matter since the plot is not the point. The artist, Angelika Rossdal and her daughter, Liv (the narrator) live solitary lives in Kvaløya, an isolated island in Norway. Liv, now 28 years old, recalls the summer she…

Book Review: Someone at a Distance by Dorothy Whipple

Someone at a Distance, written and also set in the post-World War II years, is the story of a seemingly happy family –  Ellen, her husband, Avery, and their 2 kids. Their happiness is the envy of everyone. They seem to be in a world of their own, so happy they hardly need anyone else….

Review: The Crown

After the considerable anticipation built up by the promising trailers and articles, when The Crown premiered, it did not take me long to go through the series. It turned out to be as impressive as the speculation around it had suggested. The show follows the reign of Queen Elizabeth II and the first series spans…

Decoding Art: The Birth of Venus by Sandro Botticelli

(The Birth of Venus, Sandro Botticelli. Uffizi Gallery, Florence) Imagine the Middle Ages. Stilted, stagnant, ruled by superstitions. Fear governed the senses. Man felt helpless and was helpless. Imagine the stagnancy being replaced by life and movement – that was the Renaissance. My love affair with the Italian Renaissance began more than a decade ago…

Book Review: A Constellation of Vital Phenomena by Anthony Marra

“Life: a constellation of vital phenomena—organization, irritability, movement, growth, reproduction, adaptation.”  That’s how life is defined in the medical dictionary owned by Sonja, one of the protagonists. Not only is this an apt description of life broken down to its elements, it’s an apt description for the book itself. This has been one of the…