Review: Les Misérables – The Musical at the Dubai Opera

I remember the summer that I first wept through Les Misérables by Victor Hugo, which then quickly became one of my most favourite novels. The beauty of the depiction of humans at their best and their worst made the book so relevant and resonant. Like Tolstoy’s War & Peace (another favourite), the book spoke about…

Hamlet in a Pub – My Rant on the Worst Production I Ever Saw

Hamlet is one of my favourite Shakespeare plays and I had an opportunity to watch numerous adaptations of it through the last year both on screen and on-stage. Each performance seemed to offer something new and just added to my love for this play. So, when someone from my class suggested a production of Hamlet…

Revisiting favourite books from childhood

(Picture: A Young Girl Reading. Charlotte J. Weeks – 1890) I must admit that as a child, I was not much of a reader to begin with. I was apparently going to be a non-reader born into a family of readers. However, I did love hearing stories and making them up. I remember pestering my…

Review: Danny Boyle’s Frankenstein – National Theatre Live Encore

“Hateful day when I received life!’ I exclaimed in agony. ‘Accursed creator! Why did you form a monster so hideous that even you turned from me in disgust? God, in pity, made man beautiful and alluring, after his own image; but my form is a filthy type of yours, more horrid even from the very resemblance. Satan had his…

Beyond Caravaggio -Discovering the Cult of Caravaggio

I recently attended the “Beyond Caravaggio” exhibition put up by the National Gallery, London. While I do not claim to be an expert on Baroque paintings, I am fascinated by the art of that time, especially by the stories they tell us. I must admit I knew little about Caravaggio before my trip to Italy earlier…

Book Review: A Death in the Family by James Agee

“And no matter what, there’s not one thing in this world or the next that we can do or hope or guess at or wish or pray that can change it or help it one iota. Because whatever is, is. That’s all. And all there is now is to be ready for it, strong enough…

More on the meaning of Spanish Sahara by Foals

After I wrote about what I thought was the interpretation of Spanish Sahara by Foals, a friend, Noopur, came up with a more nuanced, beautiful analysis of the song. I felt that it’s also a reminder that music exists more than just to entertain. *********************** (By Noopur ) The screen is clouded. A man walks from…

The origins of and  themes in Frankenstein by Mary Shelley

                                                (Picture: Villa Diodati, Geneva) “No more let life divide what death can join together.” ― Percy Bysshe Shelley, Adonais       The origins 1816, Summer: It was a dark and stormy night. Rain…

The meaning of Spanish Sahara by Foals

I first heard Spanish Sahara on Misfits a few years ago. At first I liked this song because of the show itself, but as I became obsessed with the song and heard it on repeat, really listened to the lyrics, it took on a meaning beyond the show. The lines that particularly haunt me: Forget…

The bleak beauty of BBC’s The Missing, Season 2

  It was with immense excitement I greeted the news that The Missing had been renewed for a 2nd season. There was no discussion I saw on social media regarding the series, no ‘noise’, no theorizing (although that changed with season 2). Yet, here we are at season 2. The core is the same –…

What Westworld says about the human condition

Or why Westworld is a must-watch for readers It’s much of a coincidence that I started reading Frankenstein around the same time as I started watching Westworld. It’s interesting how a 19th century gothic horror fiction can confront the audience or the reader with the same questions as a 21st century sci-fi show. The overarching…